Discovering the Iconic Covered Bridges of New Brunswick

Discovering the Iconic Covered Bridges of New Brunswick
02 Aug 2022

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New Brunswick’s covered bridges are some of the most iconic and beautiful structures in the province. And they’re not just for looks – these bridges are fully functional, carrying traffic across rivers and streams every day.

I got to spend some time in New Brunswick earlier this summer, and I made it my mission to visit as many covered bridges as I possibly could. My journey started in Fredericton, went through Saint John, and ended in Moncton, spanning 5 of New Brunswick’s 15 counties. There are 58 covered bridges in New Brunswick, each with its own unique history and design. I visited 23 of them on my trip.

Whether you’re a history buff or just appreciate beautiful architecture, New Brunswick’s covered bridges are definitely worth a visit.

COVERED BRIDGES NEW BRUNSWICK ETIQUETTE

Covered Bridge Etiquette

When most of these one-lane covered bridges were built, vehicles didn’t move as quickly (like horse-drawn buggies and cars built in the early 1900s), so it was never really an issue. With faster-moving vehicles now on the road, proper road etiquette must be observed.

Right of Way

Think of a stop sign. The first vehicle to approach the intersection and come to a full stop goes through the intersection first. It’s the same with a covered bridge. The closest vehicle to the bridge entrance has right of way. Because it can sometimes be difficult to see the other end of the bridge, it’s best to approach with extreme caution. When you get close, it’s always good practice to honk your horn to alert anyone coming that a vehicle is proceeding through the bridge.

Speed

These signs are put up for a reason. It is not only imperative to obey the posted signs at the bridge, but it is always best to approach the covered bridge at lower speeds, as they are often on curves, and cross rivers. You don’t want to lose control of your vehicle.

Height and Weight

Although these bridges have a pretty high clearance, they were not made for today’s taller trucks or RVs. As well, there are weight restrictions set in place for vehicles that used to travel in the early 1900s. If travelling in larger trucks or towing taller trailers, it’s always best to pre-plan your trip to ensure one of these covered bridges is not on your route.

Hartland Covered Bridges New Brunswick

Hartland Covered Bridge

Let’s start off with the granddaddy of them all. The Hartland Covered Bridge is located in rural New Brunswick, and is the longest covered bridge in the world. It spans the Saint John River and is very much still in service. This iconic bridge is a popular tourist destination, drawing visitors from all over the world who come to admire its engineering feats and unique design.

Although this bridge was built in 1901, the covered part was not constructed until 1921-1922. Once the bridge was covered, snow had to be hauled into the bridge each winter to allow horses and sleds to travel across it.

Interior lighting was installed in 1924, and a side walkway was added in 1945, making it possible to walk across the bridge.

In 1995, the Hartland bridge was featured on a Canadian postage stamp. The Olympic Torch for the 1988 Winter Olympics was carried through the bridge in 1987 on its tour across the country.

This historic landmark was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1977 and declared a Provincial Historic Site in 1999.

If you’re looking for a truly unique experience, a visit to Hartland Covered Bridge is a must!

Length: 390 m (1,282 ft)
Build Year: 1901
In Service: Yes

The Hartland Covered Bridge is located on Hartland Hill Bridge Road, stretching across the St. John River between Route 103 and Main Street in Hartland, New Brunswick. There is lots of room to park on both sides. On the west end of the bridge, there is a parking lot (north side). The Hartland Visitor Information Centre is on the east end of the bridge, and there is a large parking lot there (south side).

Patrick Owens Covered Bridges New Brunswick

Patrick Owens Covered Bridge

The Rusagonis River No. 2 Covered Bridge, more commonly known as the Patrick Owens Covered Bridge, spans 236 feet across the Rusagonis River. This charming piece of history is the only one in New Brunswick to feature a full-length window along one side. This unique feature means that you can enjoy the view of the river while you’re driving through the bridge – a real treat on a sunny day.

Length: 72 m (236 ft)
Build Year: 1909
In Service: Yes

The Patrick Owens Covered Bridge is located at 1673 Wilsey Road in Rusagonis, New Brunswick. Parking is available on the northeast side. Be careful – there are deep ruts in the turnabout area. There is a walkway between the parking area and the bridge that leads you to a great spot to view the bridge and the river.

Smyth Covered Bridge

Smyth Covered Bridge

Built over the South Oromocto River in 1912, the Smyth Covered Bridge is one of only two covered bridges remaining in Sunbury County, New Brunswick. Located in the Oromocto River Watershed, this covered bridge is still fully functional, allowing you to drive through it. Parking is available on the northeast side at Smyth Bridge Park. This area was gifted to the community by K.C. Irving, and is used by the community and those visiting the bridge.

Length: 41.5 m (136 ft)
Build Year: 1912
In Service: Yes

The Smyth Covered Bridge is located at N Mill Settlement Road, between Mill Settlement West and Hoyt, south of Fredericton, in New Brunswick.

Mill Pond Covered Bridge

Little Lepreau River No. 1.5 Covered Bridge (Mill Pond)

The Little Lepreau River No. 1.5 Covered Bridge (Mill Pond), often referred to as the Mill Pond Covered Bridge, is no longer in service, after having been moved from its original location in 1986. But, if you are out searching for covered bridges, put this one on your list. It was built in 1910 and spans the Little Lepreau River in Little Lepreau, New Brunswick. Visiting this historic spot is a great way to see New Brunswick’s collection of covered bridges.

Length: 32 m (105 ft)
Build Year: 1910
In Service: No

The Mill Pond Covered Bridge is located on Little Lepreau Road in Little Lepreau, just west of Saint John, New Brunswick. There is a small area to park your vehicle on the west side of the bridge.

Darlings Island Covered Bridge

Darlings Island Covered Bridge

Built in 1914, the Darlings Island Covered Bridge used to help connect the residents of Darlings Island to the mainland. However, a new two-lane open-air bridge was built in 1996 to accommodate more traffic, so the Darlings Island Covered Bridge is no longer open to traffic.

Length: 42 m (137 ft)
Build Year: 1914
In Service: No

The Darlings Island Covered Bridge is located at 151 Darlings Island Road in Darlings Island, northeast of Saint John, New Brunswick. There is an area to park on the south side of the bridge. The area on the north side of the bridge is close to a resident’s driveway, so best not to park on that side.

Smithtown Covered Bridges New Brunswick

Smithtown Covered Bridge

The Smithtown Covered Bridge, sometimes referred to as Hammond River No. 3, is the longest covered bridge in Kings County. Built in 1914, it is still in service today. Not only is this covered bridge a beautiful piece of New Brunswick history, but it’s also above a very popular swimming hole, making it the perfect spot to take a dip on a hot day.

Length: 57 m (187 ft)
Build Year: 1914
In Service: Yes

The Smithtown Covered Bridge is located at 845 Damascus Road, between Smithtown and Damascus, in Hampton, New Brunswick. There’s a small area for one or two vehicles to pull off on the side of the road, northeast of the bridge, but no parking is available.

Bloomfield Creek Covered Bridges New Brunswick

Bloomfield Creek Covered Bridge

The Bloomfield Creek Covered Bridge an in-service bridge in the picturesque Kennebecasis Valley. It is a well travelled one-lane covered bridge that is used daily by hundreds of commuters and spans the beautiful Bloomfield Creek.

Length: 44.5 m (146 ft)
Build Year: 1917
In Service: Yes

The Bloomfield Creek Covered Bridge is located at 20-56 Bloomfield Station Road in Bloomfield, New Brunswick. There is no parking anywhere around the bridge.

MacFarlane Covered Bridges New Brunswick

Wards Creek No. 2 Covered Bridge (MacFarlane)

The Wards Creek No. 2 Covered Bridge (MacFarlane), sometimes referred to as MacFarlane Covered Bridge, was built in 1909 and spans the calm waters of Ward’s Creek. While not the longest covered bridge in New Brunswick, this in-service bridge is a beauty that has been refurbished with newer lumber. The surrounding area is stunning – a great place to stop and admire a little piece of New Brunswick history.

Length: 18 m (59 ft)
Build Year: 1909
In Service: Yes

The MacFarlane Covered Bridge is located on Wards Creek Road in Sussex Parish, south of Sussex, New Brunswick. There is an area to park on the west side of the bridge.

Kennebecasis River No. 7.5 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Salmon)

Kennebecasis River No. 7.5 Covered Bridge (Salmon)

Built in 1908, the Kennebecasis River No. 7.5 Covered Bridge (Salmon) spans the Kennebecasis River. It is now closed to traffic, but the area surrounding the bridge, Salmon River Bridge Park, remains open. It’s a great place to admire the way bridges were built in New Brunswick at the turn of the century.

Length: 34 m (112 ft)
Build Year: 1908
In Service: No

The Kennebecasis River No. 7.5 Covered Bridge (Salmon) is located at 129 Smiths Creek Road in Roachville, just north of Sussex, New Brunswick. There is lots of room for parking on either side of the bridge.

Smith Creek No. 1 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Tranton)

Smith Creek No. 1 Covered Bridge (Tranton)

The Smith Creek No. 1 Covered Bridge (Tranton), sometimes referred to as the Tranton Covered Bridge, was built in 1927. This vintage Howe Truss design spans Smith Creek, just north of Sussex, New Brunswick, and is still in service.

Length: 37 m (121 ft)
Build Year: 1927
In Service: Yes

The Smith Creek No. 1 Covered Bridge (Tranton) is located at 5447 Roachville Road, just off New Brunswick Route 1 in Roachville, New Brunswick.

Kennebecasis River No. 9 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Plumweseep)

Kennebecasis River No. 9 Covered Bridge (Plumweseep)

The Kennebecasis River No. 9 Covered Bridge (Plumweseep), sometimes referred to as simply the Plumweseep Covered Bridge, was built over the Kennebecasis River in 1911, and is a great place to launch a canoe or kayak.

Length: 22.5 m (74 ft)
Build Year: 1911
In Service: Yes

The Kennebecasis River No. 9 Covered Bridge (Plumweseep) is located at 62 Plumweseep Road in Plumweseep, between Saint John and Moncton in New Brunswick. There is a small parking area to the north of the bridge, on the east side of Plumweseep Road.

Trout Creek No. 4 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Urney)

Trout Creek No. 4 Covered Bridge (Urney)

The Trout Creek No. 4 Covered Bridge (Urney), sometimes referred to as the Urney Covered Bridge, was built over Trout Creek in 1905. It is one of 3 covered bridges in the area between Sussex and Fundy National Park in New Brunswick. This bridge has homes on both sides, and is mostly used by those that live in the area.

Length: 20 m (66 ft)
Build Year: 1905
In Service: Yes

The Trout Creek No. 4 Covered Bridge (Urney) is located at 32 Urney Road in Waterford Township, southeast of Sussex, New Brunswick.

Trout Creek No. 5 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Moores Mills)

Trout Creek No. 5 Covered Bridge (Moores Mills)

The Trout Creek No. 5 Covered Bridge (Moores Mills), often referred to as Moores Mills Covered Bridge, was built over Trout Creek in 1923. It is one of 15 covered bridges in Kings County, New Brunswick, and one of 3 covered bridges in the area between Sussex and Fundy National Park.

Length: 18 m (59 ft)
Build Year: 1923
In Service: Yes

The Trout Creek No. 5 Covered Bridge (Moores Mills) is located at 919 Waterford Road in Waterford Township, southeast of Sussex, New Brunswick.

Kennebecasis River No. 23 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Malone)

Kennebecasis River No. 23 Covered Bridge (Malone)

The Kennebecasis River No. 23 Covered Bridge (Malone), often referred to as Malone Covered Bridge, was built in 1911 along the backroads of Kings County. It’s not easy to get to, as it is on a narrow and rocky dirt road, many miles from a major road.

Length: 18 m (58 ft)
Build Year: 1911
In Service: Yes

The Kennebecasis River No. 23 Covered Bridge (Malone) is located at 430 Upper Goshen Road in Elgin, southeast of Sussex, New Brunswick. The dirt roads leading to this bridge are quite rocky, and can be difficult to traverse when it is raining. Extreme caution should be used.

Shepody River No. 3 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Germantown Lake)

Shepody River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Germantown Lake)

The Shepody River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Germantown Lake), often referred to as Germantown Lake Covered Bridge, was built in 1903 at the south end of Shepody National Wildlife Area. This bridge uses a Howe Truss design, making it a very sturdy bridge that is still in service.

Length: 19 m (61 ft)
Build Year: 1903
In Service: Yes

The Shepody River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Germantown Lake) is located at 60 Midway Road in Germantown, between Alma and Moncton in New Brunswick. There are areas on both sides of the bridge to pull over and park to take photos.

Sawmill Creek No. 0.5 Covered Bridges New Brunswick

Sawmill Creek No. 0.5 Covered Bridge

The Sawmill Creek No. 0.5 Covered Bridge was built in 1905, and is the last covered bridge along Route 114 between Moncton and Fundy National Park. This covered bridge had to be moved slightly south of its original location by the Albert County Historical Society when a new bridge was constructed in 1975 to accommodate the increased traffic of people driving from Moncton to Hopewell Rocks Provincial Park.

Length: 33 m (105 ft)
Build Year: 1908
In Service: No

The Sawmill Creek No. 0.5 Covered Bridge is located at 5431 Main Street in Hopewell Hill, New Brunswick. There is lots of space on the side of the road to park.

Weldon Creek No. 3 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Steeves, Hartley)

Weldon Creek No. 3 Covered Bridge (Steeves, Hartley)

The Weldon Creek No. 3 Covered Bridge (Steeves, Hartley), often referred to as Hartley Steeves Covered Bridge, was built over Fredrick Brook in 1923. This 60 ft long covered bridge is still in service today and is used mainly by the residents of Salem. It is one of 9 covered bridges in Albert County, New Brunswick.

Length: 18 m (60 ft)
Build Year: 1923
In Service: Yes

The Weldon Creek No. 3 Covered Bridge (Steeves, Hartley) is located at 4459 NB-910 in the hamlet of Salem, south of Moncton, New Brunswick. There is lots of space on either side of the bridge to park on the side of the road.

Petitcodiac River No. 3 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Hasty)

Petitcodiac River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Hasty)

The Petitcodiac River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Hasty), often referred to as Hasty Covered Bridge, was built over the Petitcodiac River in 1931. Tucked away in the south corner of Westmorland County, this bridge sees very little traffic.

Length: 38 m (123 ft)
Build Year: 1931
In Service: Yes

The Petitcodiac River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Hasty) is located at 27 Powers Pit Road in Salisbury, New Brunswick. There are parking areas on the north side of the bridge that give great vantage points for photographs. There are homes and farms on the south side of the bridge, so it is best to park and get your photos from the north side.

Peter Jonah Covered Bridges New Brunswick - Turtle Creek

Peter Jonah Covered Bridge – Turtle Creek

The Peter Jonah Covered Bridge was built in 1912, but was moved from its original position along the Turtle Creek Reservoir in 2013 after a new reservoir and dam was built for the Greater Moncton water supply. It currently sits in a picturesque spot beside the pre-existing dam and reservoir, and is accessible for visitors to walk and bicycle through, but is no longer in service.

Length: 20.7 m (68 ft)
Build Year: 1912
In Service: No

The Peter Jonah Covered Bridge is located at 6 Dewey Road in Turtle Creek, New Brunswick. Parking is available on the north side of the bridge, on the east side of Dewey Road.

William Mitton Covered Bridges New Brunswick

William Mitton Covered Bridge

The William Mitton Covered Bridge was built in 1942, but is no longer in service. Located along the shores of Turtle Creek, this Burr Truss design is in need of some repairs. Because of its condition and the overgrown brush surrounding the bridge, you should not enter this timber treasure.

Length: 23 m (76 ft)
Build Year: 1942
In Service: No

The William Mitton Covered Bridge is located at 12-14 Mitton Road in Turtle Creek, New Brunswick. There is limited space to park on either side of the bridge.

Cocagne River No. 5 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Budd)

Cocagne River No. 5 Covered Bridge (Budd)

The Cocagne River No. 5 Covered Bridge (Budd), more commonly referred to as Budd Bridge, was built in 1913 and spans the Cocagne River. This bridge is still in service and is one of 7 covered bridges in Westmorland County.

Length: 25 m (83 ft)
Build Year: 1913
In Service: Yes

Budd Bridge is located at 511 Victoria Road in New Scotland, New Brunswick. There are areas on either side of the bridge to park on the side of the road. If you approach the bridge from the north, you get a fantastic vantage point for photos.

Cocagne River No. 3 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Poirier)

Cocagne River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Poirier)

The Cocagne River No. 3 Covered Bridge (Poirier), more commonly referred to as the Poirier Covered Bridge, was built in 1942 and is still in service. Located just north of Moncton in Westmorland County, the Poirier Covered Bridge stretches 136 feet across the Cocagne River.

Length: 41 m (136 ft)
Build Year: 1942
In Service: Yes

The Poirier Covered Bridge is located at 159 Poirier Office Road in Moncton Parish, New Brunswick. There is no parking at all on either side of the bridge.

Shediac River No. 4 Covered Bridges New Brunswick (Gallant, Joshua)

Shediac River No. 4 Covered Bridge (Gallant, Joshua)

The Shediac River No. 4 Covered Bridge (Gallant, Joshua), sometimes referred to as the Joshua Gallant Covered Bridge, was built in 1935. Although this bridge is out of service, it has been incorporated into the New Brunswick Federation of Snowmobile trail system, and is a popular Geocaching location.

Length: 26 m (84 ft)
Build Year: 1935
In Service: No

The Joshua Gallant Covered Bridge is located on the north side of Shediac River Road, between Evangeline and Shediac River in New Brunswick. There is a parking area at the bridge, but it has deep ruts on the way. If you have a lower vehicle, I’d recommend parking on the side of the road and walking in.

COVERED BRIDGES NEW BRUNSWICK CONCLUSION

Covered Bridges in New Brunswick

What an adventure! There were some covered bridges along the route I took that I missed, or simply couldn’t find. While I was not able to visit all of the covered bridges in New Brunswick, I was able to visit just over a third of them in the province, which I was quite happy with considering the short time I was there. I “covered” a lot of ground in 5 days!

A return trip is definitely in order so I can explore more of the covered bridges in New Brunswick. Until then, I hope you enjoyed this trip through a little over a third of New Brunswick’s covered bridges.

Cheers,
Big Daddy

If you are a PR agency or brand and would like me to review a travel destination, vehicle, restaurant, product or service, please send me an email at craig@bigdaddykreativ.ca


Craig Silva

Craig is a husband, a father, team leader, travel and food writer, senior youth group coordinator, designer, brander, community builder, volunteer, and social media strategist. Craig likes to travel, go camping, go on road trips, watch movies, build stuff, operate the grill, and sing with his band. Craig is a member of the Travel Media Association of Canada. In June 2017, PR firm Cision identified Craig as one of Canada’s top 10 most popular male bloggers in the parents and family space.

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